Archives for posts with tag: Product Concept

by Merlin Hernandez

Consumers today want a more seamless delivery interface, a more personalized and simplified process, and a valued-customer experience but most of all they want it quickly. According to a Cisco Customer Experience Report, the most important attributes in the consumer interface are access/availability of the desired product or service, knowledge and competence in delivery, and efficiency in meeting their individual needs. In this mix what a business needs to survive the far-reaching changes in the contemporary consumer culture is a more specifically customer service orientation for a more satisfied and loyal customer.

Contemporary market leaders typically have narrowed their business focus to deliver superior customer value in one of the three value disciplines – cost leadership (best prices), product leadership (highest quality), customer intimacy (most responsive service culture) – while maintaining industry standards in the other two. Companies like FedEx and Home Depot that outstrip the competition in terms of profitability tend to excel in more than one value discipline. A firm’s relative position within an industry is given by the type(s) of value discipline chosen for competitive advantage e.g. cost leadership vs customer intimacy. Dual value disciplines as the strategic focus for a service business can become the basis of sustained market leadership. But for a small business especially a start up operating in the service sector, cost and product leadership within limited resource capabilities may not be possible. There can thus be no compromise on the customer focus.

What does this say about the business of service in the SME sector? In a nutshell, a service experience that is so remarkable that it stands out from the competition. But even more important, it is burned into the memory of the customer. The service business, by its very nature, is one of fulfilling customer expectation which intrinsically entails a value discipline of customer intimacy. The emphasis is on attention to customer detail and customer service, customization, CRM efficiencies, surpassing customer expectations, timely delivery, reliability, and lifetime value. But the same can be said for a consumer product. Companies like Apple and Nike have so surpassed industry standards as to have raised customer expectations with superior products that set a higher standard which competitors are not easily able to reach. This requires intimate and detailed customer knowledge with the kind of operational flexibility that allows fast response to changing customer needs and preferences.

Small businesses are at a distinct advantage for that kind of flexibility and intimate relationships. They are not structurally distant from the customer and bogged down by multi-tiered delivery systems and processes. In factoring customer needs into the strategic mix, businesses need to identify value-creating strategies that are most appropriate. The target market remains the most influential stakeholder around which to structure a business, and customers buy value. Market leaders are adept at understanding the value drivers that motivate their customer base. And small businesses remain closer to the ground. This does not mean that there is no need for rigorous market assessment before embarking on a small business venture. But shaping the service to more closely fit customer need brands the business as customer-focused and builds customer loyalty.

Assessment of the target market, however, should present a customer that would be more interested in a best total solution that meets their needs where quality delivery is the primary consideration. A business servicing this market segment needs to be immersed in continuous delivery process innovation and improvement to both satisfy and anticipate customer needs. This would reflect the value discipline of customer intimacy which places a stronger emphasis on more esoteric and long-lasting value e.g. organic food and good health, hypo-allergenic natural cosmetics, recycled gift paper and cards, customized cooking oils or jams natural raw materials, locally grown, chemical-free, non-GMO product etc. Value here is described as relevancy and engagement in response to long term need and wider societal benefit. Strong value added strategies and deeper customer relationships might be critical for a new small business. It can bring the solid market differentiation that gives the new business the lead time for developing brand awareness and customer loyalty. This will consolidate the market presence and establish a customer base before the competition comes knocking.

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Merlin Hernandez is an entrepreneurial development and management consultant who operates mainly in the small and medium enterprise sector. For more information on this and other topics, please send enquiries to businesssolutions1168@gmail.com

 

 

by Merlin Hernandez

 

Innovation in communication technology and the Information Age have shifted the face of marketing from an emphasis on product placement to a to a heightened customer orientation. The traditional production concept of mass production and distribution, high inventories and high risk is giving way to customization and customer empowerment where the customer is seen as a partner to product development and production processes. This allows manufacturers to be more responsive to customer need, carry less inventory, and minimize surplus and waste.

The ease of Internet comparisons has led to a more savvy buyer with greater price sensitivity and much less brand loyalty. Businesses have to do much more to gain and hold market share and maintain a customer base. Companies are now finding that the old production concept of production efficiency, low cost, and mass distribution needs more service and value overlays in order to maintain competitive advantage.

This has implications for the product concept itself. While performance and innovation remain key elements to success, the idea of relationship marketing has undermined the old notion that a good product will create its own market (the selling concept). This kind of orientation presupposes an aggressive approach to placing the product in the hands of the consumer, without factoring, in any meaningful way, the consumer perspective.

Business operations today however, seek to satisfy a broad base of stakeholders – suppliers, distributers, customers, shareholders – to the benefit of more long-term relationships and more holistic strategies for maximizing profits (the marketing concept). It is based on delivery efficiencies that include product quality, performance, innovation, availability, price, service, and intangible value through added value creation. This may include a unique service culture, new uses for the product, or new technological integration and applications for expanded product usage.

The selling concept epitomizes a philosophy of selling what is made rather that making what the market needs. In the contemporary business environment, success will of necessity need to be aligned with a marketing culture that places the customer at the center. As the heightened competition inherent in globalization offers multiple options and greater capacity for comparison to consumers, businesses need to offer more than just a well-made product.

Products will need to resonate more specifically with customer need, fit into their lifestyles and aspirations, and provide some intrinsic value that extends beyond the product – enhanced social status, group leadership, luxury etc. The selling concept has shifted to more of a marketing concept which requires sound research into what customers want and need, at a price they can afford, and the most efficient methods of getting it to them. Businesses need to be market-driven with customer satisfaction as the primary focus.

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Merlin Hernandez is an entrepreneurial development and management consultant who operates mainly in the small and medium enterprise sector. For more information on this and other topics, please send enquiries to businesssolutions1168@gmail.com

 

by Merlin Hernandez

 

If only I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard someone sing the praises of some great widget and how much money there is to be made if the creator should go into business. Without trying to diminish the value of innovation, by itself it may not provide the most solid foundation required to make a success of a business venture. There is an old adage that a superior product has a good chance of doing well in the marketplace but a mediocre product with a well-defined strategy will perform far better. Many brilliant and talented innovators never make it in business because they do not have a full appreciation of the business dimension to their work. This is to emphasize that regardless of how good the product is, it is the application of sound business strategies that will bring success.

In developing the business idea, it is necessary to first determine the core benefit to be provided to the consumer. This would come from market research that identifies a basic need. Too often in the small business sector, product development is a feature of the notion that a good product will create its own market – the idea of selling what is made rather that making what the market needs. But businesses need to be market-driven with customer satisfaction as the primary focus. A viable product is a result of information on marketplace trends, customer needs, wants and preferences, customer consumption patterns, and the activities of competitors so that the right marketing mix can be developed. The product idea will therefore be defined by the targeted market segment and the client profile.

To screen and select the idea that has the greatest potential for market success, the idea is also measured against resource capabilities to be applied to production and marketing. The ability to successfully develop, produce, and market a product depends on having the right mix of available resources. The business must be sufficiently capitalized to support key research, the right personnel, the most suitable raw materials, manufacturing equipment, processes, and marketing strategies that would bring desired returns. These elements need to operate in a delicate balance – I have seen a great marketing strategy realize sales volumes that could not be fulfilled on time because of inadequate production capacity leading to cancelled orders and low profitability. The other side of the coin is strong manufacturing capabilities and a weak marketing budget which can result in poor sales, high inventory, lower prices, and financial loss.

The process of developing the full product concept will be more meaningful through consultations with potential customers to better understand the benefits they value and the necessary product attributes for market viability. This kind of partnership culture opens up a first level commitment to the idea from the customer. It is also useful at this stage to engage professional advisors, potential partners, suppliers and other stakeholders in the process for feasibility and logistic input. The concept development phase is probably the most important exercise as it introduces the product idea to the potential market as well as explores the company’s ability to make the product available. Any negatives emerging from this phase would be a clear indication that the product does not have the potential for success.

Before any commitment to the idea, an analysis of the costs of bringing the product to market should be measured against the potential contribution to sales and profits. Furthermore, an in-depth market analysis should explore the competitive environment and other environmental factors – like the climate of innovation which might put an investment into the new product at risk. For existing businesses, possible new marketing strategies should be integrated into existing marketing objectives using channels and tactics that have demonstrated success. The rationale is to diffuse the cost and structure of marketing the new product throughout the marketing system in order to achieve cost efficiencies. R&D can now be charged with developing a prototype based on product attributes identified in the market intelligence and resource capabilities, with special attention to consumer contributions obtained at the concept development phase.

The market testing phase is aimed at collating customer responses to prototypes. It provides information for product modification and refinement, as well as full development of the marketing plan. Market testing could also determine whether the product should be abandoned due to poor consumer interest. Once results of testing are favorable, the business idea has been effectively developed and the product may now be ready for commercialization and the introduction to the market. Commercialization is the action plan for introducing the product to the market. It includes timing, pricing, distribution, budget, advertising and promotion, launch impact, and adoption by the target market, along with strategies to incrementally increase sales volumes and build the brand. The process is meant to leverage the effects of marketing strategies on ROI and optimize market spend in relation to competition.

Market success does not begin with a product but with the way it delivers value and benefit to the end user. Many businesses are incorporating the customer as a partner to their product development initiatives as a way of building strong external partnerships, demonstrating the value of the customer to the organization, ensuring delivery efficiencies based on articulated customer need, while availing themselves of a ready market down the line. In developing the product idea it is also important to differentiate the product by finding new ways to extend product value beyond expectations through the addition of new layers of customer satisfaction to the development matrix.

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